What's New

December 2018


December 6, 2018--On Thursday, 6 December 2018 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library and Conference Center, there will be a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Christopher Lamb. He will be speaking on "The Mayaguez Crisis: What Happened, Why, and Does It Matter?"

Dr. Lamb is a research fellow at National Defense University. He previously served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Resources and Plans; as the director of policy planning in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict; as deputy director for military development in the State Department's Interagency Task Force for Military Stabilization in the Balkans; and as director for requirements and plans in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

 

November 2018


November 2, 2018--On Friday 2 November 2018 at 1200 in the Pentagon Auditorium, the U.S. Army Center of Military History will commemorate the Vietnam War 50th anniversary by holding a panel discussion with five Army photographers who were assigned to the Department of the Army Special Photographic Office (DASPO) during the war. See their iconic pictures and films and listen to their first-hand stories behind their stunning images.

If you are unable to attend the event in person, please follow on Facebook for the live stream at www.facebook.com/armyhistory.

 

July 2018


July 16, 2018--On Monday 16 July 2018 at 1200 in the Pentagon Auditorium, the OSD Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs Lt. Gen Dennis M. McCarthy, USMCR (Ret.), Col. Forrest L. Marion, USAFR (Ret.), and Col. Jon T. Hoffman, USMCR (Ret.). They will be speaking on "Forging a Total Force: The Evolution of the Guard and Reserve."

Dennis M. McCarthy served in the Marine Corps Reserve from 1968 to 2005, retiring as a lieutenant general. He served as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Reserve Affairs from 2009 to 2011. He holds an undergraduate degree from the University of Dayton and a law degree from Capital University Law School.

Forrest L. Marion is a staff historian at the Air Force Historical Research Agency at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. He served 30 years in the Air Force in both active and reserve components, and retired as a colonel in 2010. He holds advanced degrees in history from the University of Alabama and the University of Tennessee. 

Jon T. Hoffman is the chief historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History. He served 30 years in the Marine Corps Reserve, including 17 years of active duty, and retired as a colonel in 2008. He hold an undergraduate degree from Miami University (Ohio), a Master's degree from Ohio State University, and a law degree from Duke University Law School.

Marion and Hoffman are the authors of Forging a Total Force: The Evolution of the Guard and Reserve (2018).

 

June 2018


June 1, 2018--The OSD Historical Office recently published Forging A Total Force: The Evolution of the Guard and Reserve by Col. Forrest L. Marion, USAFR (Ret.) and Col. Jon T. Hoffman, USMCR (Ret.). This book traces the evolution of law and policies governing the Guard and reserve from the militias of the Revolutionary War era to today's high-tempo operational force.

Forrest L. Marion is a staff historian at the Air Force Historical Research Agency at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. He served 30 years in the Air Force in both active and reserve components, and retired as a colonel in 2010. He holds advanced degrees in history from the University of Alabama and the University of Tennessee, is a frequent contributor to Air Power History, and is the author of three books on Air Force history.

Jon T. Hoffman is the chief historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History. He served 30 years in the Marine Corps Reserve, including 17 years of active duty, and retired as a colonel in 2008. He served six years as deputy chief historian for the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office, and is author, coauthor, or editor of eight books on topics ranging from Marine Corps history to the Army's work on the Panama Canal.

For more information, and to read the volume, visit our Other Publications page under http://history.defense.gov/Publications/Other-Publications/. Hard copies are available for purchase from the Government Printing Office (GPO).

 

May 2018

May 22, 2018--On Tuesday, 22 May 2018 at 1100 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library and Conference Center, the OSD Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Mara Karlin. She will be speaking on "Building Militaries in Fragile States: Challenges for the United States."

Dr. Karlin is an Associate Professor of the Practice of Strategic Studies at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. She is also the former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy & Force Development.




 

April 2018

April 26, 2018--The OSD Historical Office is pleased to announce that we now have a presence on Flickr. We will be periodically uploading pictures from the history of the Office of the Secretary of Defense photo archive. Currently, we have posted forty-five pictures from the Carter administration, focusing on former Secretary of Defense Harold Brown, who was the subject of our most recent publication, Harold Brown:Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981.

Our Flickr account can be accessed at https://www.flickr.com/photos/osdhistory/albums/with/72157695867293395 or by clicking the icon at the bottom of this page.




 

 

  

March 2018


A video link of the panel, courtesy of the National Archives' Youtube channel can be found at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwTLnV1YS0

**Photos from the event can be viewed at history.defense.gov/Whats-New/Events/Roundtable-Event-Photos or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/OSDHO**

March 5, 2018--
On Monday, 5 March 2018 at 1200 in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives in Washington, DC, the OSD Historical Office presents a roundtable discussion for Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981

Roundtable panelists include Secretary of Defense Harold Brown (1977-1981); Secretary of Defense William J. Perry (1994-1997); Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert O. Work (2014-2017); and Dr. Edward C. Keefer, author of Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981.


 

 

  

January 2018


January 11, 2018--On 11 January 2018 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library and Conference Center, the OSD Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Max Boot. He will be speaking on "Edward Lansdale's Vietnam: Lessons for Afghanistan and Iraq."

Max Boot is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of the forthcoming book, The Road Not Taken: Edward Lansdale and the American Tragedy in Vietnam.

 

 

  

December 2017


*****CANCELLATION*****

REGRETATABLY, THE OSD HISTORICAL OFFICE ANNOUNCES THE CANCELLATION OF THE 5 DECEMBER 2017 ROUNDTABLE EVENT AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES DUE TO UNFORSEEN CIRCUMSTANCES.

THE OSD HISTORICAL OFFICE PLANS TO RESCHEDULE THIS EVENT IN THE NEAR FUTURE. WE WILL POST AN ANNOUNCEMENT WHEN WE HAVE CONFIRMED A NEW DATE.

December 5, 2017— On Tuesday, 5 December 2017 at 1200 in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives in Washington, DC, the OSD Historical Office presents a roundtable discussion for Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981.

Roundtable panelists include Secretary of Defense Harold Brown (1977-1981); Secretary of Defense William J. Perry (1994-1997); Dr. Eliot A. Cohen, the Robert E. Osgood Professor at Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies; and Dr. Edward C. Keefer, author of Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981.

 

 

  

November 2017


November 8, 2017— On Wednesday, 8 November 2017 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library and Conference Center, the OSD Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Rachel Levandoski. She will be speaking on "War, Psychological Trauma, and the American Medical Experience in World War I."

Rachel Levandoski is a contract historian in the OSD Historical Office. She is a specialist in 20th century American military history and the social history of medicine.

 

 

  

October 2017


October 18, 2017— The OSD Historical Office is pleased to announced the release of a supplement containing a selection of documents cited in Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981. The author, Dr. Edward C. Keefer, selected documents based on their historical significance, with a preference for material created by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and those not included in Foreign Relations of the United States volumes covering the Jimmy Carter administration. Many are being released here for the first time.

The documents are arranged by chapter and can be accessed by clicking on the document title in the table of contents. All of the documents are either unclassified or have been properly declassified. The supplement is formatted as a large PDF (800+ pages; approximately 85MB), and can best be viewed by downloading the file in its entirely rather than by opening it in a browser. It can be accessed by clicking here

 

  

September 2017


September 30, 2017— Today, the OSD Historical Office published Harold Brown and the Imperatives of Foreign Policy, 1977-1981 by Edward C. Keefer. It examines Secretary of Defense Harold Brown's foreign policy contribution to the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Brown began his tenure at the Pentagon determined to limit his focus to national security policy and military issues. As the Carter administration faced a series of complex international challenges and crises, however, Brown became more involved in formulating and implementing foreign policy.

It is available for download here

 

  

September 2017

September 20, 2017— On Wednesday, 20 September 2017 at 1300 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Edward C. Keefer. He will be speaking on his new book, Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981.

Dr. Keefer joined the OSD Historical Office in 2009. Prior to his joining OSDHO, Dr. Keefer served for 34 years as an editor for the U.S. Department of State's official documentary series, Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS). During that time, he edited 25 FRUS volumes, many of which documented U.S. policy during the Vietnam War. After 2002, he was general editor of the series until his retirement from the State Department in 2009. Dr. Keefer holds a B.A. from McGill University and a Ph.D. in history from Michigan State University.

  

August 2017

August 9, 2017— The OSD Historical Office recently published Harold Brown: Offsetting the Soviet Military Challenge, 1977-1981, volume IX in the Secretaries of Defense Historical Series. The book examines Secretary of Defense Harold Brown's efforts to counter the Soviet Union's growing military strength during the administration of President Jimmy Carter. The author, Dr. Edward C. Keefer, served 34 years as an editor of the U.S. Department of State's official documentary series, Foreign Relations of the United States, and has written articles and contributed to books on United States policy in East and Southeast Asia.

For more information, and to read the volume, visit our Secretaries of Defense Historical Series page under "Publications," http://history.defense.gov/Publications/Secretaries-of-Defense-Historical-Series/. Hard copies are available for purchase from the Government Publishing Office (GPO).

  

July 2017

July 25, 2017— On Tuesday, 25 July 2017 at 1300 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Eliot A. Cohen. He will be speaking on "The Big Stick."

Dr. Cohen is the Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies at the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. His most recent book is The Big Stick: The Limits of Soft Power and the Necessity of Military Force (2017).

 

 

 

          
 

        

        

May 2017

May 24, 2017— On Wednesday, 24 May 2017 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Michael Neiberg. He will be speaking on "Path to War: U.S. Entry into World War I."

Dr. Neiberg is a Professor of History in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the U.S Army War College. His most recent book is The Path to War: How the First World War Created Modern America (2016).

 

 

 

          
 

        

        

April 2017

April 25, 2017— On Tuesday, 25 April 2017 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series panel featuring Dr. Thomas Boghardt; Dr. Robert Doughty; and Dr. Jennifer Keene. They will be speaking on "Perspectives on American Entry into World War I."

Dr. Boghardt is a senior historian at the U.S. Army Center of Military History where he focuses on U.S. military intelligence operations in postwar Europe. He has served as the historian at the International Spy Museum and as a Thyssen fellow at Georgetown University. He is the author of several books, including The Zimmerman Telegram (2012) and Spies of the Kaiser (2005). He received his PhD in modern European history from the University of Oxford.

Dr. Doughty retired as a Brigadier General from the U.S. Army in 2005 after forty years of service. He graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1965 and received his PhD from Kansas University in 1979. He served as the Head of the Department of History at the U.S. Military Academy from 1985-2005. He is the author of numerous articles and five books and is currently working on a paper about Franco-American relations during World War I.

Dr. Keene is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Chapman University. She is a specialist in American military experiences during World War I and has published three books on American involvement in the First World War: Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America (2001); World War I: The American Soldier Experience (2011); and, The United States and the First World War (2000). She is also currently president of the Society of Military History. She received her PhD from Carnegie Mellon University.

 

          
 

        

        

March 2017

March 28, 2017— On Tuesday, 28 March 2017 at 1230 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Michael Warner. Dr. Warner will be speaking about "The Rise and Fall of Intelligence: Lessons from History for Tomorrow."

Dr. Warner is the Command Historian at the U.S. Cyber Command.

 

          
 

        

        

February 2017

February 21, 2017— Today, the OSD Historical Office published NSPS: The Brief, Eventful History of the National Security Personnel System by Anthony R. Crain. In early 2003 Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld attempted to transform civilian management in the Department of Defense by replacing the General Schedule (GS) system with a new National Security Personnel System (NSPS). NSPS was a significant challenge to the GS system that had implications far beyond the Defense Department. Rumsfeld's OSD successfully pushed the system through Congress but struggled to implement it effectively. After becoming a subject of great controversy, DoD wound down the system in the first years of Barack Obama's presidency.

With the publication of this first occasional paper, the OSD Historical Office embarks on a new series that intends to provide scholarly perspectives on policy issues, offer a forum for our historians' papers presented at academic conferences, summarize office publications that are works in progress, or cover other discrete topics.

 This paper is available for download here

          
 

        

        

February 2017

February 28, 2017— On Tuesday, 28 February 2017 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference and Library Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Dr. Francis Gavin. Dr. Gavin will be speaking on "Rethinking the History of the Nuclear Age."

Dr. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and Director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins University-Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

 

          
 

        

        

December 2016

December 6, 2016— On Tuesday, 6 December 2016 at 1200 in the Pentagon Auditorium, the Historical Office will host a discussion with former Secretary of Defense William Perry (1994-1997) about his memoir, My Journey at the Nuclear Brink. Former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy Michele Flournoy (2009-2012) will moderate.

 

          
 

        

        

December 2016

December 1, 2016— On Thursday, 1 December 2016 at 1230 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library & Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Annette Amerman. She will be speaking on "Marines at Belleau Woods."

Amerman is the Branch Head and Historian of the Marine Corps History Division's Historical Reference Branch.

          
 

        

        

November 2016

November 3, 2016— On Thursday, 3 November 2016 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Kevin Hymel. He will be speaking on "Patton's Photographs: War As He Saw It."

Hymel is a historian in the U.S. Air Force Chief of Chaplains Office.

          
 

        

        

September 2016

September 28, 2016— On Wednesday, 28 September 2016 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a Speaker Series event featuring Brian Linn. He will be speaking on "Elvis's Army: Military Transformation in the 1950s."

Linn is the Ralph R. Thomas Professor in Liberal Arts at Texas A&M University and a Fulbright Distinguished Chair at the University of Birmingham. He is the author of "Elvis's Army: The Transformation of the Atomic Soldier" (2006) and four previous books: "The U.S. Army and Counterinsurgency in the Philippine War" (1989); "Guardians of Empire: The U.S. Army and the Pacific, 1902-1940" (1997); "The Philippine War, 1899-1902" (2000); and "The Echo of Battle: The Army's Way of War" (2007).
          
 

        

        

June 2016

June 20, 2016— The OSD Historical Office is pleased to announce the release of a supplement complimenting the official history of Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird by making available a selection of documents cited in the notes of Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973. The documents selected were chosen for their historical significance with a preference for material created by the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

The documents are arranged by chapter and can be accessed by clicking on the document title in the table of contents. All of the documents are either unclassified or have been properly declassified. The supplement can be accessed by clicking here

        

        

June 2016

June 28, 2016— On Tuesday, 28 June 2016 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a History Speakers Series event marking the anniversary of the Battle of the Somme. The talk will feature Thomas Christianson, LTC(R), Senior Historian in the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office.

        

        

May 2016

May 26, 2016— On Thursday, 26 May 2016 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a History Speakers Series event on "American Grand Strategy Today: Lessons from the Cold War." The talk will feature Dr. Hal Brands, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense, Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, and Associate Professor of Public Policy and History at Duke University. His most recent book is Making the Unipolar Moment: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Rise of the Post-Cold War Order.  

        

        

March 2016

March 3, 2016— On Thursday, 3 March at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, the Historical Office will host a History Speakers Series event on air combat operations during the Vietnam War. The talk will feature Dr. Mark Clodfelter, Professor of Military Strategy at the National War College. He is the author of The Limits of Air Power: The American Bombing of Air Vietnam (2006).   

        

        

January 2016

January 21, 2016 — On Thursday, 21 January at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Library and Conference Center, Dr. John Sherwood of the Naval History and Heritage Command will speak on the development and evolution of riverine warfare up to the Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War.

Dr. Sherwood is the author of War in the Shallows: U.S. Navy Coastal and Riverine Warfare in Vietnam, 1965-1968.

November 2015

November 17, 2015 — On Tuesday, 17 November at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, Andrew Krepinevich and Barry Watts will be discussing the Office of Net Assessment and Andy Marshall’s role in shaping American defense strategy. The Director of Net Assessment, James Baker, will be making introductory remarks.

Dr. Andrew F. Krepinevich, Jr. is President of the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments. He assumed this position in 1993, following a 21-year career in the U.S. Army. He served in the Department of Defense’s Office of Net Assessment, and on the personal staff of three secretaries of defense. He has also served as a member of the National Defense Panel, the Defense Science Board Task Force on Joint Experimentation, and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates’ Policy Board. He currently serves on the Chief of Naval Operations' Advisory Board. He recently published The Last Warrior: Andrew Marshall and the Shaping of Modern Defense Strategy, which he co-authored with Barry Watts. His other recent book is titled 7 Deadly Scenarios: A Military Futurist Explores War in the 21st Century. His next book, War Like No Other, has a tentative release date of 2017. A graduate of West Point, Dr. Krepinevich holds an M.P.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. 

Barry Watts was a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic & Budgetary Assessments (CSBA) from 2002 until retiring in 2013. From 2006 to 2010 he taught a course on net assessment in Georgetown University’s strategic studies program. Prior to joining CSBA, he headed the Office of Program Analysis and Evaluation at the Defense Department (2001-2002). Following retirement from the Air Force in 1986 until 2001, Mr. Watts was with the Northrop Grumman Analysis Center, which he directed from 1997 to 2001. During his Air Force career, he flew a combat tour in Vietnam in F-4s, taught logic and philosophy at the U.S. Air Force Academy, served two tours in the Office of Net Assessment, and headed the Red Team in the Air Staff’s Project Checkmate. He has written on a wide variety of military topics, including a number of CSBA monographs. He holds a B.S. in Mathematics from the U.S. Air Force Academy and an M.A. in Philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh.

October 2015

 

 

October 22, 2015 — On Thursday, 22 October at 1100 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, Dr. Don Carter will be speaking about U.S. Army forces in Europe during the 1950s and early 1960s.

Dr. Carter graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1977 and served as a Field Artillery Officer until 1992. During that time, he received a Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University in 1985 and served as a military history instructor, both at West Point and at the U.S. Army Field Artillery School at Fort Still, Oklahoma. After leaving the Army he joined the U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH) as an archivist. In 1995, he left CMH to serve with the Gulf War Declassification Project and the U.S. Army Declassification Activity. He returned to CMH in 2003 as a historian. His publications include "Eisenhower Versus the Generals," Journal of Military History (October 2007); "The U.S. Military Response to the 1960-1962 Berlin Crisis," for the National Archives pamphlet commemorating the release of Cold War records; "Wargames in Europe: The U.S. Army Experiments with Atomic Doctrine," in Blueprints for Battle (University Press of Kentucky, 2012); and Forging the Shield: The U.S. Army in Europe, 1951-1962 (Center of Military History, United States Army, 2015).

 

 

 

September 2015

 

 

September 30, 2015 — Today the OSD Historical Office published Creating the Alter Ego: Deputy Secretaries of Defense in the Truman Administration, 1949-1953, by Shannon E. Mohan. Throughout the history of the Department of Defense, the deputy secretaries have been vital in administering, shaping, and helping to carry out military and national security policy. However, the histories, identities, and influence of the 32 officeholders have received little scholarly attention. This is the first in a series of studies by the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office that examine the deputies' roles in departmental operations and the policymaking process.

Creating the Alter Ego traces the origins of the position, including biographical highlights of the first three deputies, and explains their responsibilities in relation to their respective secretaries.

It is available for download here

 

 

 

September 2015

 

 

September 30, 2015 — Today the OSD Historical Office published The Decline of Détente: Elliot Richardson, James Schlesinger, and Donald Rumsfeld, 1973-1977, by Walter S. Poole. It examines the role of three secretaries of defense during Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford's administrations. Despite an overall thaw in U.S.-Soviet relations during Nixon's first term, tension with the Soviet Union marked the tenures of these three secretaries. In particular, Schlesinger's management of U.S. military aid to Israel in October 1973 to counter Soviet aid to Arab states and Rumsfeld's efforts to undermine strategic arms limitations talks illustrated the limitations of détente.

It is available for download here 

 

 

 

July 2015

 

 

July 17, 2015 — The American public remembers the terrorist attacks of 9/11 in the same way that an earlier generation recollects the attack on Pearl Harbor. People remember where they were when they heard the news and then watched the horrifying images unfold on television. In 2007, the OSD Historical Office published an account of the aircraft strike on the Pentagon and the next few days thereafter. Titled Pentagon 9/11, the book did not attempt to provide an overarching narrative that covered all angles. Instead, it kept the focus "on what happened to people and to the building on 11 September 2001 as seen chiefly through the eyes of participants and observers." Based primarily on oral history interviews conducted in the weeks after the attack, it presented a firsthand view of that horrific experience.

On 17 July, the OSD Historical Office will release 65 of those oral history transcripts that underpinned the book, making them available to scholars and the public for the first time. They run the gamut from military personnel and civilian employees in the building to first responders arriving on the scene, and include an interview with Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. The oral history interviews were those conducted by the OSD Historical Office. Many other interviews were done by the military services, and those are not included in this release.

The interview transcripts will be available on the OSD Historical Office website at http://history.defense.gov/

 

 

 

July 2015

 

 

July 14, 2015 — On Tuesday, 14 July 2015, the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office presents a Roundtable Discussion and Book Launch for Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973. This event will be held from 12:00 pm-1:30 p.m. in the William G. McGowan Theater at the National Archives, Washington, DC.

Former United States Senator John Warner (VA) will deliver keynote remarks. Roundtable panelists include Dr. Richard A. Hunt, author of Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973; Dr. Jeremi Suri, Mack Brown Distinguished Chair for Leadership in Global Affairs, University of Texas at Austin; and Dr. George Herring, Alumni Professor of History Emeritus, University of Kentucky.

This event is open to the public; no RSVP is necessary.

 

July 2015

 

 

July 13, 2015 — On Monday, 13 July 2015, the Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office will host a panel discussion to mark the publication of the seventh volume in the "Secretaries of Defense Historical Series." Volume VII is entitled "Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973." Panel participants include the author, Dr. Richard A. Hunt; Office of the Secretary of Defense Historical Office Chief Historian, Dr. Erin R. Mahan; Charles Bowsher, former Comptroller General of the United States; and, Lt. Gen. Robert E. Pursley USAF (Ret.).

This event will be held from 1230-1330 in the Pentagon Conference Center, Room B6.

 

June 2015

 

 

June 15, 2015 — The OSD Historical Office recently published Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973, Volume VII in the Secretaries of Defense Historical Series. The book examines Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird's efforts to reconstitute the Department of Defense during the last years of the Vietnam War. The author, Dr. Richard A. Hunt, has written articles and reviews on the war in Vietnam, including Pacification: The American Struggle for Vietnam's Hearts and Minds.

For more information, and to read the volume, visit our Secretaries of Defense Historical Series page under "Publications."

 

June 2015

 

 

June 9, 2015 — On Tuesday, 9 June 2015 at 1100 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, Alan McPherson will be speaking about U.S. military operations in Latin America, how U.S. soldiers had to encourage nationalism, and how the lessons from the occupations in Haiti, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic are parallel to the current situations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Alan McPherson is Professor of International and Area Studies and Director of the Center for the Americas at the University of Oklahoma. He is the author of dozens of articles and book chapters on U.S.-Latin American relations, as well as the author or editor of seven books. "The Invaded," from which his Pentagon talk is taken, has won two national book prizes.

 

May 2015

 

 

May 5, 2015 — On Tuesday, 5 May 2015 at 1200 in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, Colonel Rod Andrew will be speaking on "Operation Starlight: America's First Battle in Vietnam." Colonel Andrew is a Professor of History at Clemson University where he specializes in Southern history. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in both the antebellum and new South periods, with particular emphasis on the New South. His first book, "Long Gray Lines: The Southern Military School Tradition" (2001), explains the rise of military schools in the antebellum South and their continuing appeal after the Civil War. He recently completed the biography, "Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior to Southern Redeemer." For this biography, he was awarded the 2009 Mary Lawton Hodges Prize in Southern Studies. He is also a Colonel in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve and a field historian with the Marine Corps History Division.
 

 April 2015

 

 

April 22, 2015 On 22 April 2015 at 10:30 a.m. in the Pentagon Auditorium (BH650), the Hon. Kim Beazley, Australian Ambassador to the United States, will deliver an address to mark the 100th anniversary of the Australian & New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC).

 

 February 2015

 

 

February 24, 2015Dr. Max Paul Friedman is a Professor of History at American University where he specializes in 20th-century U.S. foreign relations. A graduate of Oberlin College and U.C. Berkeley, he was a Woodrow Wilson Postdoctoral Fellow and has taught at Boulder, Tallahassee, and Cologne. His first book, Nazis and Good Neighbors: The United States Campaign against the Germans of Latin America in World War II (Cambridge University Press, 2003) won the Herbert Hoover Prize in U.S. History and the A.B. Thomas Prize in Latin American Studies. He co-edited, with Padraic Kenney, Partisan Histories: The Past in Contemporary Global Politics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). His most recent book is Rethinking Anti-Americanism: The History of an Exceptional Concept in American Foreign Relations (Cambridge University Press, 2012). He is a 2013-2014 John Simon Guggenheim Fellow and 2014 American University Scholar/Teacher of the Year. On Tuesday, 24 February 2015 at 1 pm in Room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, he will be speaking about U.S.-French relations in a presentation entitled, "FRENchEMIES. France and the United States: Junior Partner or Oldest Enemy?"

 

 January 2015

 

 

January 16, 2015Today the OSD Historical Office published ISA-The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs: A Brief History, by Joel C. Christenson. Written at the request of Assistant Secretary of Defense for ISA Derek Chollet, it traces the Office's development through more than 65 years of service to the Department of Defense and the nation. From modest origins coordinating foreign military assistance in the late 1940s, to its evolution as a policymaking hub through numerous Cold War crises, to its pivotal role in shaping U.S. national security policy in the post-9/11 world, the study provides the first dedicated historical treatment of the office long known as DoD's "Little State Department."  It is available for download here.

 

 December 2014

 

 

December 3, 2014Dr. Lawrence (Larry) Yates is from the U.S. Army Center of Military History, where he is currently writing an official history of the U.S. Army’s role in Somalia, 1992-1994. Previously, he worked at the Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas and taught and wrote about U.S. military interventions, contingency and stability operations, and unconventional warfare. He is the author of "Leavenworth Paper No. 15, Power Pack: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965-1966"; "The US Military’s Experience in Stability Operations, 1789-2005"; "The U.S. Military Intervention in Panama"; coauthor of "My Clan Against the World: U.S. and Coalition Forces in Somalia, 1992-1994"; and coeditor of—and a contributor to—"Block by Block: The Challenges of Urban Operations.

 

On Wednesday 3 December at 11:30am in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center, he will be speaking about "Crisis, Innovation, Restoration: The U.S. Military in Panama, 1989-1990." In his presentation, Dr. Yates will discuss the U.S. military in Panama and its role in Operation Just Cause.

 

 October 2014

 

 

October 9, 2014— Dr. Thomas Lassman is curator of the post-1945 rocket and missile collection at the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution. He is the author of Sources of Weapon Systems Innovation in the Department of Defense: The Role of In-House Research and Development, 1945-1960, (U.S. Army Center of Military History, 2008). He received a B.A. degree in history from Washington University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University. His research interests focus on the history of U.S. industrial and military R&D and the history of weapon systems acquisition in the Department of Defense.

 

He will discuss the management and organization of weapons research and development in the U.S. Army during the early years of the Cold War (1945-1960) on Thursday, October 9th at 12:30pm in room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center.

 

 September 2014

 

 

September 29, 2014 — The OSD Historical Office recently published special studies #5 and #6 in its Cold War Foreign Policy Series. The series emphasizes the secretary of defense’s role in the U.S. foreign policymaking process and how the position evolved between 1947 and the end of the Cold War. Study #5, written by Joel C. Christenson, is entitled Expanding the Secretary’s Role in Foreign Affairs: Robert McNamara and Clark Clifford, 1963-1968. It examines the continued growth in the secretary’s role in overseas affairs as the United States escalated its war in Vietnam and confronted other challenges during the administration of Lyndon B. Johnson. Study # 6, written by Richard A. Hunt and entitled Melvin Laird and Nixon’s Quest for a Post-Vietnam Foreign Policy, addresses growth in the defense secretary’s influence relative to the secretary of state during the first term of the Nixon administration.

 

Click here to download PDF versions of these studies.

 

 April 2014

April 2014

 

 

April 30, 2014 — On Wednesday, April 30th at 1:00pm, the OSD Historical Office will host a panel discussion in the National Defense University’s Baruch Auditorium to mark the publication of the newest volume in the History of Acquisition in the Department of Defense series, Adapting to Flexible Response, 1960-1968. The panel will feature the volume’s author, Dr. Walter S. Poole and former Secretary of Defense Harold Brown, as well as Dr. Linda S. Brandt and Dr. Shannon A. Brown, both of NDU’s Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy.

Adapting to Flexible Response presents a broad overview of weapons acquisition during the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson presidential administrations. It includes focused case histories of major weapons programs and useful explanations of program management, budgeting, and contracting practices during the 1960s. The volume also captures the influence of politics and national security strategy on acquisition, as well as the unique challenges of fielding weapons for the Vietnam War. The author of the volume, Dr. Walter S. Poole, is a highly respected military historian who has written numerous books, including five volumes in the series, History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as several co-authored studies and shorter monographs for the Office of Joint History.

 

 April 2014

 

April 16, 2014 — Colonel Clarence R. Anderegg, (USAF, Ret.) is Director of Air Force History and Museum Policies and Programs, and serves as the historical adviser to the Secretary of the Air Force and Air Force Chief of Staff.

He is a thirty-year Air Force veteran, and flew more than 170 missions in the Vietnam War. A graduate of Troy State University and the Air Command and Staff College, he is the author of The Ash Warriors and Sierra Hotel.

Col. Anderegg will speak on change within the U.S. Air Force after the Vietnam War in Room B6 of the Pentagon Conference Center on Wednesday, April 16th at 1100.

 

 March 2014

 

 

March 25, 2014 — Dr. Adam R. Seipp is Associate Professor of History at Texas A&M University. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2005.

A specialist in German military history, his most recent book, Strangers in the Wild Place: Refugees, Americans, and a German Town, 1945-1952, was published in 2013.

He will speak on the U.S. occupation of Germany from 1945-1949 in Room B1 of the Pentagon Conference Center on Tuesday, March 25th at 1330.

 

 February 2014

 

 

February 26, 2014 — The OSD Historical Office recently published Adapting to Flexible Response, 1960–1968, Volume II in the series, History of Acquisition in the Department of Defense. The book presents a broad overview of weapons acquisition during the John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson presidential administrations. It includes focused case histories of major weapons programs and useful explanations of program management, budgeting, and contracting practices during the 1960s. The volume captures the influence of politics and national security strategy on acquisition, as well as the unique challenges of fielding weapons for the Vietnam War. The author of the volume, Dr. Walter S. Poole, is a highly respected military historian who has written numerous books, including five volumes in the series, History of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as several co-authored studies and shorter monographs for the Office of Joint History.

For more information, and to read the volume, visit our Acquisition History page.

 

 February 2014

 

 

February 24, 2014 — Dr. Isaac Hampton II is the Command Historian at U.S. Army South, San Antonio, Texas, where he provides historical support to U.S. Army activities in the Caribbean and Latin America.

An accomplished scholar and lecturer, in 2013 he published The Black Officer Corps: A History of Black Military Advancement from Integration Through Vietnam.

He will speak on the journey of African American officers through the Vietnam era in the Pentagon Auditorium on Monday, February 24 at 1100.

 

 October 2013

 

 

October 8, 2013 — A former Wall Street analyst and speechwriter, Ian Toll is the author of two widely respected works of naval history.

His first book, Six Frigates: The Epic History of the of the Founding of the U.S. Navy (2006), was the winner of the Samuel Eliot Morison and William E. Colby Awards, and his second work, Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-42, was released in 2011 to wide acclaim.

Mr. Toll lives in San Francisco.

 

 July 2013

 

 

July 1, 2013 — Dr. Carol Reardon is the George Winfree Professor of American History at Penn State University. She specializes in the Civil War and the Vietnam War eras and focuses on the evolution of professional military education, the development of military doctrine, and military theory. Professor Reardon is actively involved in professional military education and conducts staff rides to Civil War battlefields and open-air classrooms to discuss the art of war in historical context. She has also taught at the U.S. Army War College, the Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and the U.S. Military Academy.

Dr. Reardon is the author of Solders and Scholars (1990), Pickett's Charge in History and Memory (1997), and Launch the Intruders: A Naval Squadron in the Vietnam War, 1972 (2009). Her current project is an analysis of the military history of the Civil War's Eastern theater.

 

 June 2013

 

 

June 17, 2013 — Paul A. Gilje is a George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the Department of History at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Gilje earned his M.A. and Ph.D. from Brown University and is a specialist in American History with a focus on the early republic. He is the author of The Road to Mobocracy: Popular Disorder in New York City, 1763-1834; Riots in America; Liberty on the Waterfront and The Making of the American Republic, 1763-1815. Liberty on the Waterfront received the 2004 Society for Historians of the Early American Republic Best Book Prize and the 2004 North American Society for Oceanic History John Lyman Book Award in the category of United States Maritime History.
 

 May 2013

 

 

May 21, 2013 — Dr. David Crist is a senior historian for the Defense Department and a special advisor to senior officials in the U.S. government on the Middle East. Crist is an officer in the Marine Corps Reserve and served two tours with special operations forces in Afghanistan and Iraq. His previous publications include Gulf of Conflict: A History of U.S.-Iranian Confrontation at Sea (2009). He holds a B.A. from the University of Virginia and a master's and doctorate in Middle Eastern history from Florida State University.
 

 April 2013

 

 

April 23, 2013 — Max Boot is currently the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick senior fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and a contributing editor to the Weekly Standard and the Los Angeles Times. Before joining the CFR, Boot worked eight years as a writer and editor at the Wall Street Journal, and from 1992–1994 he was an editor and writer for the Christian Science Monitor. He has also served as an advisor to U.S. commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan and as a senior foreign policy advisor to the John McCain and Mitt Romney's presidential campaigns. Mr. Boot is the author of three books including The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power (2003); War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History 1500 to Today (2006); and Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present (2013).
 

 April 2013

 

 

February 4, 2013 — Dr. Edward L. Ayers is currently the President of the University of Richmond and a historian specializing in the Antebellum South. Prior to his appointment at the University of Richmond, Dr. Ayers was a professor at the University of Virginia from 1980–2007 and served as the Buckner W. Clay Dean of the College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences from 2001–2007. He is the author and editor of 12 books, including "In the Presence of Mine Enemies: War in the Heart of America, 1859–1863," winner of the Bancroft Prize and The Promise of the New South finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and National Book Award. Dr. Ayers is also an editor for the Papers of Abraham Lincoln and is the co-host of "BackStory with the American History Guys," a weekly radio show that examines the historical roots of contemporary issues.
 

 January 2013

           

 

 

January 22, 2013 — The 2012 edition of Key Officials is now available online. The document is a compilation of information about the organization of and senior officials in the Department of Defense since its establishment in 1947. Key Officials encompasses the upper echelons of the department, including civilian officials in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the military departments as well as the top leadership of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Combatant Commands, and certain field activities and agencies. It shows all officials who have held a listed OSD position since the inception of the department and indicates where positions have been superseded by new titles or organizational changes.

To keep the information current, the Historical Office is publishing Key Officials online and will revise it every month to reflect the latest information. The Historical Office will print a limited number of hard copy versions every four years, generally late in the inaugural year of each administration (after the vast majority of changes in senior officials occur). The online version can be found at: http://history.defense.gov/pub_ko.shtml.

 

 January 2013

           

 

 

January 9, 2013 — National Park Service Historian Frank O'Reilly will discuss the Battle of Fredericksburg at the next Department of Defense History Speaker Series event on Wednesday January 9, 2013. Mr. O'Reilly has for many years been an interpreter and historian at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, and his familiarity with the grounds, tactics, and order of battle provides him with considerable knowledge of the events that occurred in December 1862. Although the Battle of Fredericksburg is remembered for the massacre of Union soldiers at Marye's Heights, Mr. O'Reilly suggests that the fighting between General Stonewall Jackson and Union Generals George G. Meade and John Gibbon was the battle's most decisive, as the Union broke the Confederate lines. Mr. O'Reilly's publications include Stonewall Jackson at Fredericksburg and The Fredericksburg Campaign: Winter War on the Rappahannock, which won the 2002 Capital District Book Award, the James I. Robinson, Jr., Book Award, the Daniel Laney Book Award, and the Richard Barksdale Harwell Book Award. Currently, Mr. O'Reilly is researching the Seven Days Campaign and the Battle of Malvern Hill.
 

 December 2012

           

 

 

December 3, 2012 — Dr. Allan Millett's presentation is entitled "Korea November 1950" and will discuss the month in which U.S. forces first encountered China's People's Volunteer Army (PVA). The U.S. Arm’s encounter with the PVA resulted in a series of defeats and retreats leading to the lowest point in the war. Currently, Dr. Millett is the Director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies and the Stephen E. Ambrose Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. He is a specialist in the history of American military policy, military institutions, and twentieth century wars. Dr. Millett's most recent book is The War for Korea, 1950–1951: They Came from the North (2010) and he is the author six others including Semper Fidelis: The History of the United States Marine Corps (1980), Their War for Korea (2002), and The War for Korea, 1945–1950: A House Burning (2005).
 

 October 2012

           

 

 

October 23, 2012 — This presentation recognizes the 50th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, when the United States and the Soviet Union probably came closest to engaging in World War III. While the story of the 13–day confrontation is well known, Professor Coleman pays particular attention to the largely ignored period immediately afterward, when the Kennedy Administration had to ensure that the Soviets and their Cuban allies actually followed through on the agreements reached to avert war. That process proved exceedingly difficult and contentious, not least because domestic considerations came to the fore after the threat of nuclear conflict seemed to abate. Dr. Coleman directs the Presidential Recordings Program at the University of Virginia's Miller Center and has been working with and writing about classified White House tapes for 13 years. He is also an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia and teaches classes in the History Department on American political history, Cold War history, and nuclear history. He has published widely on U.S. politics, nuclear strategy, and the Cold War. His most recent book is Real-World Nuclear Deterrence: The Making of International Strategy (2006), co-authored with Joseph M. Siracusa.
 

 September 2012

           

 

 

September 27, 2012 — Dr. Edward Marolda is a faculty member at Georgetown University and the former Senior Historian of the U.S. Navy. He holds a PhD in history from The George Washington University and served as a U.S. Army officer during the Vietnam War. He has authored, coauthored, or edited twelve books on U.S. naval history. Dr. Marolda will discuss the impact of U.S. maritime power on the modern history of Asia based on his Ready Seapower: a History of the U.S. Seventh Fleet, recently published by the Naval History and Heritage Command. Since its birth in World War II, the Seventh Fleet has served as one of the primary instruments of U.S. foreign policy in the vital but volatile region, buttressed America's Far Eastern alliances, protected oceangoing commerce, and battled America's foes in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and the Arabian Gulf. Today, and indeed throughout the late 20th and early 21st centuries, the fleet has also worked to deter armed aggression and to defeat piracy, terrorism, and weapons' proliferation. Fleet units have often acted quickly to help Asian peoples recover from typhoons, volcanoes, tsunamis, and other natural disasters. There will be time for questions and audience participation.
 

 September 2012

           

 

 

September 4, 2012 — Dr. Thomas Clemens is a retired professor of history who has long specialized in the Battle of Antietam, to include leading regular tours of the battlefield. He has edited, annotated, and published a two-volume study of the campaign originally researched and written by Ezra Carman, a regimental commander in the battle. The Maryland Campaign of September 1862 is widely regarded as one of the best accounts of the pivotal operation. The battle of Antietam is often called a tactical draw, but a strategic victory for the Union forces. Dr. Clemens’ presentation will examine the army which George McClellan led, what he did with it, and his advantages and disadvantages. Much is often made of the logistical challenges faced by Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, but few have studied the similar constraints faced by McClellan in this campaign. This reappraisal is long overdue and the conclusions may surprise those accustomed to the traditional "bumbling and cautious" interpretation of the man Lee called "the most able general I faced.
 

 August 2012

           

 

 

August 28, 2012 — Dr. Birtle is chief of the Military Operations Branch at the Army Center of Military History. He is the author of U.S. Army Counterinsurgency and Contingency Operations Doctrine, 1860-1941 and a companion volume covering the period 1942-1976, and is currently writing the Army’s official history of its advisory program in Vietnam covering 1961-1965. General Zinni’s 35 years of service in the Marine Corps included two tours in Vietnam, as a company command and as an advisor to a Vietnamese Marine Corps battalion. His last active duty billet was Commander in Chief of U.S. Central Command during 1997-2000. Dr. Willbanks retired from the Army as a Lieutenant Colonel with twenty-three years service as an Infantry officer in various assignments, to include a tour as an advisor with a South Vietnamese infantry regiment during the 1972 North Vietnamese Easter Offensive. He has been on the faculty at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College since 1992. His published books include Abandoning Vietnam; The Battle of An Loc and The Tet Offensive: A Concise History. Dr. Birtle will open the program with a brief overview of the U.S. advisory effort in Vietnam. General Zinni and Dr. Willbanks will then talk about their experiences as advisors in Vietnam, any conclusions they drew from that experience about the overall advisory effort, and their observations that might be relevant to the recent effort in Iraq and the current effort in Afghanistan.
 

 July 2012

           

 

 

July 17, 2012 — Christopher George was born in Liverpool, England, in 1948, and became a U.S. citizen in 1995. He admits to “divided loyalties on the War of 1812” but strives to take an objective view of the war. Author of Terror on the Chesapeake: The War of 1812 on the Bay, he has served as editor of the Journal of the War of 1812 since 1996, as well as coordinator of the National Symposium of the War of 1812 series held annually in Baltimore in October. His presentation will explore the causes of the war and the political conditions that pitted President Madison's ruling Republican Party against the Federalists, with consequent affect on the American war effort in the opening months of the conflict. Mr. George also will contrast the initial U.S. failures on land with a more successful record at sea based on the victories of U.S.S. Constitution, as well as American privateers preying on British commercial shipping.
 

 June 2012

           

 

 

June 15, 2012 — Robert Krick, retired Chief Historian for the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, will give a presentation which will focus on Jackson's initial operations in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley in 1862 and explain how his success there catapulted him to national and international prominence. His highly drilled infantrymen covered ground so fast in moving from one battle to the next that they soon were dubbed "foot cavalry." Despite being outnumbered 3 to 1, he maneuvered his forces skillfully and made them appear to be numerically much stronger. He would prove to be one of the most effective commanders for the South until he died in action at the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863.
 

 May 2012

           

 

 

May 10, 2012 — This presentation launches the OSD Historical Office’s just-published book Rearming for the Cold War, 1945-1960. This is the first volume of five in the Defense Acquisition History series. The project began several years ago under the auspices of the Army Center for Military History and has received support from the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology & Logistics, as well as the service history offices. The OSD Historical Office now has oversight. Although numerous studies have looked in depth at particular weapons programs, this series is the first to provide an overarching account of defense acquisition from 1945 to the end of the 20th century. Dr. Elliott V. Converse III, a retired Air Force officer and author of the book, will lead off and talk about his project. Professor Benjamin F. Cooling of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces will set the book in the overall historical context of defense acquisition. Dr. Jacques S. Gansler, a former Under Secretary for AT&L, will follow with perspectives on the topic based on his experience managing DoD acquisition. Dr. Roy L. Wood, dean of the Defense Systems Management College, will moderate the panel and the question and answer session with the audience that will close out the presentation.
 

 April 2012

           

 

 

April 11, 2012 — Dr. Ethan Rafuse, a widely published author on the Civil War, will give the inaugural presentation of the DoD Historical Speaker Series at 1130 on 11 April in the Pentagon Auditorium. His talk will assess the opening months of the conflict President Lincoln called "A People's Contest." The ongoing program is planned and coordinated by the historical offices of OSD, the Joint Staff, and the four military services. A primary theme will be the commemoration of our nation’s past conflicts, to include the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 (1812–1815), the 150th anniversary of the Civil War (1861–1865), the 100th anniversary of World War I (1914–1918), and the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War (1956–1975).
 

 April 2012

           

 

 

April 10, 2012 —The OSD Historical Office recently released its newest publication and latest addition to the Secretary of Defense Historical Series - McNamara, Clifford, and the Burdens of Vietnam, 1965-1969. In conjunction with the National Archives and the Vietnam Center at Texas Tech University, the office is sponsoring a program about the book. The author, Dr. Edward Drea, will join with noted Vietnam historian George C. Herring and former Secretary of Defense Harold Brown to discuss the book and pertinent issues related to the Vietnam War and the direction of that war effort coming from the Department of Defense. The program will begin at noon on Tuesday 10 April at the National Archives.